Should Christians Celebrate Christmas?

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ;

May the grace and peace of God our Father, and of our Lord Jesus-Christ be with you. I thank the Father of Lights, in the multitude of His mercies toward me, for allowing me to write these few lines concerning Christmas, a widely celebrated holiday. The question before us is whether Christians should celebrate Christmas.

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DISCLAIMER: At the end of this article, you will find comments from readers who disagree with the position of this article. We strongly encourage you to read their views as well, and provide your “scripture-based” feedback, if you have one (regardless of whether you agree or disagree with this article). God bless you and may His Spirit ALONE guide you in TRUTH!

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This question is not a trivial one, and for many, it is a sensitive one. Many indeed have already written extensively on it. Bible scholars largely agree on the fact that Christmas was not the time when Jesus was born, and its secular origins leading to how it is celebrated today are also very well-documented.

I submit to you that the celebration of Christmas be viewed in light of our freedom in Christ.

1 Corinthians 10:29,30…why is my freedom judged by another person’s conscience? 30 If I partake with thanksgiving, why am I criticized because of something for which I give thanks?

The Apostle Paul was addressing the question of whether Christians should eat meat sacrificed to idols, and his answer was, Yes, they can…but!

1 Corinthians 10:25-29Eat everything that is sold in the meat market, without raising questions for the sake of conscience, 26 since the earth is the Lord’s, and all that is in it. 27 If any of the unbelievers invites you over and you want to go, eat everything that is set before you, without raising questions for the sake of conscience. 28 But if someone says to you, “This is food from a sacrifice,” do not eat it, out of consideration for the one who told you, and for the sake of conscience. 29 I do not mean your own conscience, but the other person’s.

The reason why Christians were allowed to eat meat sacrificed to idols is because Christians, by thanksgiving, recognize that regardless of what others may say or practice (e.g. offering a meat to their idols), there is only one God, and everything belong to Him, including that meat sacrificed to idols.

1 Corinthians 8:4-6About eating food sacrificed to idols, then, we know that “an idol is nothing in the world,” and that “there is no God but one.” 5 For even if there are so-called gods, whether in heaven or on earth—as there are many “gods” and many “lords”— 6 yet for us there is one God, the Father. All things are from him, and we exist for him. And there is one Lord, Jesus Christ. All things are through him, and we exist through him.

But the reason there was a caveat to this permission was the effect of our eating on the conscience of the unbelievers who were eating precisely with the objective of honoring their idols. Paul laid this argument as follows

1 Corinthians 8:9-11 …be careful that this right of yours in no way becomes a stumbling block to the weak. 10 For if someone sees you, the one who has knowledge, dining in an idol’s temple, won’t his weak conscience be encouraged to eat food offered to idols? 11 So the weak person, the brother or sister for whom Christ died, is ruined by your knowledge. 12 Now when you sin like this against brothers and sisters and wound their weak conscience, you are sinning against Christ.

There are several key elements which demand our attention:

Element 1: Paul Is Referring To Unbelievers as “Brothers” and “Sisters”

***** Update: Upon further study – and as opposed to what we said under Element 1 and Element 2 below – it may be that the “brothers” and “sisters” that Paul was speaking of were indeed members of the church, perhaps referring to those who were not yet sufficiently mature. While this does not change the main position of the article, it is nevertheless worth noting. ******

While these terms are often used to refer to members of the church, the context of this passage indicates (from the best of our understanding) that Paul is using them here to refer to unbelievers. And he refers to members of the Church as “the ones who have knowledge”. Which knowledge? The knowledge “all true Christians” have that there is only one God and one Lord, which he restated a few verses earlier (1 Corinthians 8:4-6).

Paul therefore, is not talking, as some may suppose, about different beliefs systems within Christianity, regarding eating and drinking, for every Christians should know that everything is the Lord’s.

Element 2: Christ Died For The Unbelievers Too!

Instead, Paul seeks to remind us that Christ died for all, including unbelievers. Indeed, it is God’s desire that all will accept His gift of salvation through Jesus. Therefore, Christians should be careful with their actions because they might contribute to the loss of some of those unbelievers. This is sinning against Christ (1 Corinthians 8:12)

Element 3: The Contrast Between 1 Corinthians 8 And 1 Corinthians 10

In 1 Corinthians 8 Paul stated…

1 Corinthians 8:10For if someone sees you, the one who has knowledge, dining in an idol’s temple, won’t his weak conscience be encouraged to eat food offered to idols?

When a Christian goes into an idol’s temple, he is aware that all the food he will find has been sacrificed to idols. And the unbeliever seeing him may be further encouraged to eat food offered to idols. But while the Christian is enjoying his freedom in Christ, the unbeliever will dig himself or herself deeper in his or her idolatry. Hence, the unbeliever may perish, and therefore the Christian, acting unwisely, is sinning.

In 1 Corinthians 10 Paul stated…

1 Corinthians 10:25-27Eat everything that is sold in the meat market, without raising questions for the sake of conscience, 26 since the earth is the Lord’s, and all that is in it. 27 If any of the unbelievers invites you over and you want to go, eat everything that is set before you, without raising questions for the sake of conscience.

Here the Christian does not have prior knowledge of the meat. He is invited by someone and is free to eat without consequences. Matter of fact, he is even advised not to ask to meat provenance (why should he complicate matters!).

But, if he is informed by his host that the meat was sacrificed to idols, then the case becomes similar to 1 Corinthians 8 and he should therefore refrain from eating it, for the same reason – not to embolden the unbeliever further.

1 Corinthians 10:28, 29 – But if someone says to you, “This is food from a sacrifice,” do not eat it, out of consideration for the one who told you, and for the sake of conscience. 29 I do not mean your own conscience, but the other person’s.

The Celebration of Christmas May Not Be A Different Problem

There may lie the difficulty of the Christmas celebration. We are free in Christ and therefore we recognize that everything is the Lord’s including Christmas Eve and Christmas Day! They are the Lord’s. And if by giving Thanks we celebrate these times, I believe our Thanksgivings are accepted.

We are also free to celebrate Christmas with whomever invites us. But are we allowed to celebrate it in a way that would encourage some further in their idolatry? The answer is No, we are not. The idol’s temple gave a different meaning to the meat that was sacrificed in it, and so is the declaration of the host that the meat he just served was sacrificed to idols. Outside of the idol’s temple, and in the absence of the host’s confession, the Christians was permitted to eat meat sacrificed to idols.

I submit to you that similarly, in celebrating Christmas, Christians should not engage in activities which challenge the sovereignty of God and of Jesus. For instance – and I pray I am speaking with the Lord’s permission – decorating your house and exchanging gifts are permitted, while teaching your children the mythical person of Santa Claus and his reindeers, who rewards children for their good deeds is not, since only God is worthy of our praise and worship, and it is God who give good gifts.

James 1:17 – Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, who does not change like shifting shadows.

Some unbelievers think very little of Santa Claus, although they would not mind taking a picture with him or even decorate their house with him. This may be similar to the past when some unbelievers did not think much of idols, and easily ate the food sacrificed to them.

But others are careful to perpetuate, year after year, and generation after generation, the person of Santa Claus, their children truly believing in his existence and his purpose. This may be similar to the past when other unbelievers thought highly of idols, and would eat the food, not just because it was food, but “because” it was sacrificed to idols. We are not permitted to engage in activities which would only further encourage these beliefs.

These statements, are in agreement to how Paul concluded his teaching on the matter, that whatsoever you do, you ought to ask yourself this main question: Is it to the Glory of God?

1 Corinthians 10:31So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do everything for the glory of God.

In Jesus Name. AMEN.

4 thoughts on “Should Christians Celebrate Christmas?

    1. Thanks Beverly for your comment. I certainly understand your concern, even though this article did not seek to promote Christmas.

      However, our liberty in Christ is bounded only by our duty to honor God in everything we do. When someone chooses to commemorate Jesus’s birth (even though it is at the wrong date such as Christmas), sometimes even publicly, isn’t Jesus glorified?

      I must also ask whether there is a flaw in my reasoning in this article. And if yes, I would really appreciate if you could point to it (or them) so that I may learn.

      God bless you abundantly!

  1. Anthony Ewers

    I would agree with Beverly, and would encourage biblicaldiagnosis to prayerfully consider Revelation chapter 2, especially noting verses 6, 14-15, and also consider Acts 15:29.

    How do we come to understand scriptural interpretations are correct? Consider 2 Peter 1:20 and Matthew 18:18-20. Paul alone has this doctrine about eating food that is sacrificed to idols being “ok”, whereas elsewhere in scripture the agreement is that it is not ok. I would base my judgement on the matter not on one persons personal revelation, but on the balanced and consistent message given in scripture.

    Christmas represents probably the churches biggest compromise with a Pagan religion, it isn’t even likely that Messiah was born at this time so why participate in an illusion. Messiah said, before “Abraham, I AM”, how can we really understand when His birthday is anyway, God exists from eternity past to eternity future, the begging and the end?

    1. Anthony, much thanks for your commentary! It is very much appreciated. I appreciate the arguments put forth including the verses you used to support them. My name is “Serge” (sounds better than BiblicalDiagnosis:)).

      Forgive me the length of this response, but I think your commentary merits it. I shall elaborate below on the points you raised, and how, while I am not yet entirely convinced, your inputs merit that I make some edits to the article, so that anyone who reads it will be encouraged to read the comments section as well. Therefore, I will add a disclaimer, and may make some future edits (while keeping the original texts for other readers to follow…a living article of sort I hope).

      1. Regarding Paul “personal” revelation contradicting other section of scriptures:

      I believe that the scriptures do not contradict itself, but your assertion that Paul’s position on eating meat sacrificed to idols differs from the others suggest that there are contradictions in the scripture. I also do not believe that Paul would be receiving a revelation that contradicts the other apostles. Nevertheless Acts 15:20 that you mentioned is clear.

      I believe that Paul actually agrees with Acts 15:20. Note that in 1 Corinthians 8:7 he himself stated that because not everyone has the knowledge that everything is God’s, “Some have been so used to idolatry up until now that when they eat food sacrificed to an idol, their conscience, being weak, is defiled.”

      I believe this is precisely why Acts 15:20 was written. To prevent what Paul stated in 1 Corinthians 8:7. My understanding is that the church at Antioch was a young church, and being a society used to eating meat sacrificed to idols, the concerns of Paul in 1 Corinthians 8:7 was very much a valid one.

      Please note also that Paul never gave a “blank check” about eating meat sacrificed to idols. He stipulated the conditions very clearly, remaining in agreement with the others (to the best of my understanding at least).

      2. Regarding Revelation 2

      I admit that I am spending time in prayer and reading the scriptures because you raised a very good point with the story of Balaam. So far (and I could be wrong), this is what I am gathering:

      I am quoting the pertinent passage in Numbers 25:1-3

      “While Israel was staying in the Acacia Grove, the people began to prostitute themselves with the women of Moab. 2 The women invited them to the sacrifices for their gods, and the people ate and bowed in worship to their gods. 3 So Israel aligned itself with Baal of Peor, and the Lord’s anger burned against Israel.”

      This we understand from Moses (Number 31) that it was Balaam who had incited them to this. And it says that the Israelite were invited by the women of Moab to the sacrifices of their gods, “and the people ate and bowed in worship to their gods”. Paul clearly (like the other apostles) objected very strongly with this practice.

      1 Corinthians 10:28, 29 – But if someone says to you, “This is food from a sacrifice,” do not eat it…

      But in addition, I think the account in Number 25 is different from what Paul is talking about in the first place. In Numbers 25, they went and started to worship (i.e. legitimizing) other gods (idolatry), while Paul instead was emphasizing that the recognition that there is only one God.

      1 Corinthians 8:4-6 – About eating food sacrificed to idols, then, we know that “an idol is nothing in the world,” and that “there is no God but one.” 5 For even if there are so-called gods, whether in heaven or on earth—as there are many “gods” and many “lords”— 6 yet for us there is one God, the Father. All things are from him, and we exist for him. And there is one Lord, Jesus Christ. All things are through him, and we exist through him.

      Nevertheless, having written all the above, I will continue in prayer and searching the scriptures in consideration of the points that both you and Beverly made. I am editing the text right now, to add the disclaimer to invite others to the comment section.

      Blessings!
      Serge

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